Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Joanna Lumley’

Celia Imrie, Imelda Staunton

“FINDING YOUR FEET” My rating: C 

111 minutes | MPAA rating: PG-13

I won’t say I hated “Finding Your Feet,”  the most recent in a string of films (“The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel,” “I’ll See You in My Dreams,” “The Hero”) depicting love amongst the geriatric set.

But I just barely tolerated it.

Despite a solid cast of veteran British thesps — Imelda Staunton, Timothy Spall, Celia Imrie, Joanna Lumley, David Hayman, John  Sessions — the latest film from director Richard Loncraine (“Brimstone & Treacle,” “Richard III,” “My House in Umbria”) shamelessly panders to its blue-haired target audience. In its own way it’s as derivative and contrived as a Frankie and Annette beach party movie — except you don’t want to see this cast in bikinis.

Sandra (Staunton) is stunned to discover that Mike, her titled husband of 40 years, has been having an affair for nearly that entire time. So it’s splitsville, not only from Mike but from Sandra’s privileged, cash-intensive (and politically conservative) lifestyle.

On the rebound she washes up at the door of her estranged sister, Bif (Imrie), a septuagenarian hippie whose life of adventure and close friendships are diametrically opposed to Sandra’s stunted outlook.

(more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Edwina and Patsy

Jennifer Saunders and Joanna Lumley as Edina and Patsy

“ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS: THE MOVIE” My Rating: C-

90 minutes | MPAA rating:  R

Making “Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie” must have been a blast.

Think about it: A reunion of old coworkers and their beloved characters, awesome scenery in the south of France, and a never-ending stream of famous-face  cameos — Rebel Wilson, Jon Hamm, Joan Collins, Chris Colfer, Lily Cole, Jerry Hall, Lulu (yes, the “To Sir With Love” singer), Graham Norton, Gwendoline Christie, Perez Hilton, Stella McCarthy and more skinny supermodels than the brain can process — that turns the movie into a celebrity version of Where’s Waldo.

If only some of the fun had ended up on the screen.

Fans of the old “Ab-Fab” TV show will be bitterly disappointed. Newcomers will wonder why anybody bothered.

It’s enough to make you look back fondly on the “Sex and the City” movies.

The long-running ’90s Brit sitcom featured Jennifer Saunders (who scripted the series and this movie) as Edina Monsoon, a  hoplessly inept p.r. maven to London’s fashion industry, and and Joanna Lumley as her running buddy Patsy Stone, an aging former model who can rarely think past where her next alcohol/pharmaceutical fix is coming from.

It was a savage comedy about a couple of reprehensible people.

Eddie and Patsy are still reprehensible, but the charm has worn very, very thin.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

wolf 2“THE WOLF OF WALL STREET” My rating: C+ (Opens wide on Dec. 25)

179 minutes | MPAA rating: R

Is “The Wolf of Wall Street” the result of some sort of show-biz wager?

It’s as if Martin Scorsese (arguably America’s greatest living filmmaker) and Leonardo DiCaprio (Scorsese’s latter-day DeNiro) accepted a challenge to make a three-hour movie that would entice us to laugh along with despicable characters – just because they thought they had the special juice to pull it off.

And there are moments when they come close.

“Wolf” is based on the memoir by Jordan Belfort, a poster boy for ‘90s stock market shenanigans, who made millions selling his customers worthless securities and ended up going to prison for his misdeeds.

Now I’m the sort of fellow who tries to find the essential humanity in just about everyone, but Belfort is the financial equivalent of Adolf Hitler and Pol Pot. He’s arrogant and greedy and virtually without conscience – capitalism at its most corrupt.

And DiCaprio and Scorsese have to sweat like stevedores to make him a palatable companion for 180 minutes.

This is a speedball of a movie that maniacally tears along from one scene of misbehavior to the next, hardly ever slowing down to contemplate just what message we’re to take away. Presumably Scorsese disapproves of Belfort and what he represents … but the film feels just the opposite. It seems a monumental  celebration of greed and excess.

(more…)

Read Full Post »